A Day Worth Remembering.

    226
    6
    SHARE

    Today is the 90th Anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

    Permanently protecting the right of all women to vote was a tremendous accomplishment: not just for women, but for all those who value the dignity of the human spirit and equality before the law.

    As I celebrate that achievement, I am reminded of another important day in the long history of the struggle for women’s rights: January 29, 2009. President Obama signing the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act was a triumphant moment, but also sobering one. In 2009, 233 years after the founding of our Republic, it took an act of Congress to tell us what should have been readily apparent: it is immoral and unjust to pay a woman less than a man because of her gender.

    Sadly, 177 members of the House voted against protecting the fundamental right of gender equality – including my opponent, Frank Wolf. His vote on this matter is unconscionable and embarrassing. His failure to stand up for our wives, our sisters, and our daughters is one of the biggest reasons I got into this race.

    As we look back and pay tribute to the progress we have made, let us be mindful of the work that lies ahead. Terrible pay gaps, among other injustices, still exist, despite laws prohibiting them. We must be vigilant in the discovery and eradication of these unfair practices. One day, we will finally deliver on America’s promise of gender equality. I hope that, for our children, the cold despair of gender discrimination will be a relic confined to history books.

    Let us renew our commitment to eliminating gender-based inequality: not just in law, but in reality.

    (Image Source: White House Photo)

    • Venu

      Pick an important date to launch your false political attack, to drum up emotional support:

      “Today is the 90th Anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution.”

      Misrepresent the issue being discussed (facts are never your friend in a political race!):

      “Sadly, 177 members of the House  voted against protecting the fundamental right of gender equality – including my opponent, Frank Wolf.”

      Pretend like this issue (probably pandering to get votes) is the most relevant to your campaign, because the people love someone who can make their priorities what the polls want:

      “His vote on this matter is unconscionable and embarrassing. His failure to stand up for our wives, our sisters, and our daughters is one of the biggest reasons I got into this race.”

      Makes sure you throw in the children, they’re so adorable:

      “I hope that, for our children, the cold despair of gender discrimination will be a relic confined to history books.”

      My guess on why Wolf and the other Republicans voted against the bill was that the Supreme Court had ruled in 2007 against the premise of the bill that the the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination resets with each new discriminatory paycheck.

      I disagree with Wolf’s vote, but don’t start acting like Wolf is evil incarnate for casting his vote just because your anxious to try and paint him as barbaric or cruel on Women’s Rights so you can win a political election.

    • Jeff Barnett

      Venu,

      I didn’t “misrepresent the issue being discussed”: this matter is one of gender equality.  A restrictive statute of limitations, like existed before Lily Ledbetter, makes it difficult to seek redress for unfair pay practices. When a legal barrier  functionally disadvantages women who are striving for pay equity, voting to support that legal barrier is a vote against gender equality.  

      I didn’t – and wouldn’t – portray Mr. Wolf as “evil incarnate,” to use your words.  I also didn’t suggest that he is “barbaric” or “cruel” on women’s rights. What I did say is that his vote on this bill was a vote against women. I know the arguments that opponents of this bill advanced, and I believe that many of the Republicans who voted against it are decent people. Nevertheless, by voting to make it very difficult to file pay discrimination claims, they sided with corporate interests instead of working women.

      As for this issue’s place in my campaign, Venu,  there’s no pretending. If you ask people who heard me speak in January and February, when I was competing for the Democratic nomination, many of them will tell you that I talked about Lily Ledbetter. I thought Wednesday was an appropriate day to remind us of the work that lies ahead with women’s rights, but I’ve been concerned about Mr. Wolf’s vote on Lily Ledbetter for quite some time. I wouldn’t cynically pick up this issue in an attempt to get votes. I take this position for the same reason I take every stand: I think it’s what’s right.