World’s Top Companies DO Recognize Climate Change While Romney Ignores It

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    Imagine a world in which some of the top companies rallied behind the idea of putting a price on carbon pollution. In fact, you won’t have to use your creative juices for too long because it’s already happened.


    “The [Carbon Disclosure Project] survey of the “Global 500″ (the largest companies by market capitalization) showed more than 80 percent of responders recognizing climate change as a threat, with 37 percent seeing it as a real and present danger. That’s an increase of 10 percent since 2010.”

    Chairman for the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) and its Global Climate Change Forum, Paul Dickinson, put it this way: “Most of the things that get done in the world get done by the world’s largest companies. My point is that governments need to step up and match the operational domain of the corporations. That means international treaties.”

    So climate change does exist, after all. Who’d have thought?! But if you look at Mitt Romney’s energy “plan,” it would seem as though climate change were just a myth.

    The “Romney Agenda” lists the following six points in the “Executive Summary” of his energy plan: “empower states to control onshore energy development; open offshore areas for energy development; pursue a North American Energy Partnership; ensure accurate assessment of energy resources; restore transparency and fairness to permitting and regulation and facilitate private-sector-led development of new energy technologies.”

    Any mention of climate change in the “Romney Agenda”? Zilch. It’s almost as if Romney were living in a different world than the rest of Americans, a world where middle-income was somewhere between $200,000 and $250,000 in annual income. Oh, wait…

    Whatever reality Romney is living in, it’s clear that it’s not one shared by most Americans. It’s just as clear that Romney doesn’t belong anywhere near the most powerful government post in the world, a post where climate change, among other issues, has to be taken seriously, let alone acknowledged.

    • kindler

      …is that many of the biggest multinational corporations are in some ways becoming more progressive than the party that ostensibly represents their interests — on issues like climate change, gay rights, organics, etc. (mostly where they’ve been driven by consumers and activists, but also as a reflection of their actual interests).

      I see today’s GOP as an uneasy coalition of the wealthy and one of the scariest collection of malcontents the US has ever seen.  I really think that the economic elite will regret their alliance with the conspiracy-theory-driven tea party lunatics.