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Miss the memo, Ken?

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From the Democratic Party of Virginia: 

One hundred days ago the national Republican Party released its “Autopsy of the 2012 Election,” calling for a party re-brand in an attempt to broaden its appeal to a changing electorate. Here in Virginia, Ken Cuccinelli appears to have missed the memo, as he continues to prioritize his extremist social agenda at the expense of jobs and the economy.

 

From the start, Cuccinelli has disagreed with his own party’s attempt to appear more moderate, saying Virginians “don’t want, don’t need, and sure as heck can’t afford” a more moderate Republican Party. Cuccinelli may believe this election is about showing “the country that Conservatism… is not old or worn out,” but his agenda continues to leave women’s health, equal rights, and economic progress on transportation out in the cold.

 

Leaving aside Cuccinelli’s prior comments comparing abortion to slavery and saying homosexuality leads to destruction of the soul [Washington Post, 2/05/08], here are a few choice examples just from the last week in the race for Virginia governor:

 

Cuccinelli on Gay Marriage

Yesterday ABC News reported that Ken Cuccinelli led state Attorneys General to sign a letter suggesting that a Supreme Court decision overturning a gay marriage ban in California would somehow open the door to legalizing polygamy. 

Cuccinelli on the Voting Rights Act

As reported yesterday in the Virginian-Pilot, last year Cuccinelli compared seeking federal approval for changes in voting laws to “running to mommy.” 

Cuccinelli’s “incomprehensible war against the Silver Line”

Don’t just take my word for it, the Washington Post editorial board earlier this week said that with Ken’s “transportation policy, ideology trumps practicality and Virginia’s long-term prospects — like the daily lives of its commuters — are a secondary priority.” 

When Cuccinelli attempted to minimize the record of his extremist social agenda at a technology forum last week, he drew muffled laughter from the crowd of technology and business professionals who found his claim of not overdoing it a tough pill to swallow. 

One hundred days after his own party called on its members to put what's best for Virginia families ahead of his extreme and divisive agenda, Ken Cuccinelli continues to prove that he missed the memo.