Home Daily Feature Wednesday News: Trump’s “Tiny” Offer on Gun Control; “Virginia Effect” Should Have...

Wednesday News: Trump’s “Tiny” Offer on Gun Control; “Virginia Effect” Should Have GOP Very Worried; Dems Flip KY House Seat Trump Won by 49 Points; Amazon Coming to Arlington?

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by Lowell

Here are a few national and Virginia news headlines, political and otherwise, for Wednesday, February 21.

  • Quizzical

    Banning bump stocks is a no-brainer, right? I don’t understand the hesitation in getting at least that done on the state level, the federal level, or both.

    Trump being Trump, he will likely “signal” that he is willing to do it, but in the end everything with him is a bargaining chip, and he won’t do it unless he gets something.

    • “I don’t understand the hesitation in getting at least that done on the state level, the federal level, or both.”

      The hesitation is that the GOP is a wholly owned subsidiary of an extremist organization, the NRA.

      • Quizzical

        They are smart and well-financed. Yet they drag their feet on the simplest no-brainer gun control legislation. I have to believe it is a deliberately chosen strategy. My guess is that the politicians want to fund-raise off of it, and the NRA wants to make sure that gun control legislation, no matter how non-controversial, is exhausting both politically and financially — a scorched earth strategy.

  • Quizzical

    Something troubles me about the “red flag” law proposals. The way it is being presented, it is a response to gun violence that doesn’t touch anything to do with guns. It would be better than nothing; on the other hand it is being used as a placebo, to do something without really doing anything.

    Consider that the “red flag”laws would not have stopped the Las Vegas shooter. He did not post on social media, telegraphing his intentions. He did not post some version of the ISIS pledge of allegiance. What he DID was amass an arsenal of semi-automatic “assault weapons” outfitted with bump stocks, thousands of rounds of ammunition, and likely extended mags for the weapons.

    And so, the question has to be asked: why isn’t it a red flag when somebody preps the way the Las Vegas shooter prepped?

    That leads to other questions, e.g., why, after a background check for the purchase of a firearm, is the record of the purchase erased from the database? Why do we not allow law enforcement to keep track of who is buying this stuff? Why not track purchases of ammo and extended mags? If an individual publishes intentions to commit a mass shooting, shouldn’t the first step be that law enforcement runs the person through their database to see what guns, magazines and ammo the person has purchased, or whether the person live in a household where such an arsenal exists?

    Sometimes people develop mental problems, and that doesn’t always conveniently happen before the person builds his arsenal. Sometimes it is after.