Saturday, January 21, 2017
Home Tags House of Delegates

Tag: House of Delegates

Should Virginia House of Delegates Dems Come Up With (And Run...

Promoted from the comments section of my analysis on Virginia Dems' path to winning back the House of Delegates. Thanks to "bobgoldstein" for this...

Can Dems Win Back the Virginia House of Delegates? Let’s Start...

This took a while, but courtesy of VPAP, we finally have full, official (as opposed to the early, unofficial numbers I procured a couple...

Virginia House Districts Won by Hillary Clinton Highlight Most Vulnerable GOP...

As you can see from the following graph, Virginia Republicans currently - in spite of their outrageous gerrymandering - hold 11 Virginia House of...

Ken Boddye: The Prince William Progress Coalition Grows!

by Ken A. Boddye, Democratic candidate for House of Delegates in the 51st district (eastern Prince William County) against right winger Rich Anderson. Go...

Following Up on Mark Warner’s 2014 Performance

Before the 2014 election I wrote about specific areas to watch for sorting out ongoing political trends in Virginia. After Mark Warner's nail-biting reelection night, I tore apart the Warner campaign's claim that they ran significantly ahead of other Democrats in Virginia's rural areas, with a follow-up diary comparing Mark Warner to Tom Perriello. Today, I want to take the time to follow up on some of the areas I picked as canaries in the coal mine of Virginia politics. While dissecting Election 2014 by House of Delegates and State Senate district is still being finalized by the good people at VPAP, here are some preliminary findings.

9th House of Delegates District (Franklin, Henry, Patrick Counties): The 9th had been at the center of Warner's crossover support in 2008, and featured a lively fight by Ward Armstrong after Republicans targeted him in their gerrymandering. The result in 2015? Mark Warner received 36% of the vote, just marginally above Obama's 34% in 2012.

12th House of Delegates District (Montgomery and Giles Counties, Radford City): Warner received 52% of the vote here, higher than Obama's 50% but behind Kaine's 54%. This is a unique district, the influence of Virginia Tech makes it very different than other Southwest districts. It also remained one of the best districts for Libertarian candidate Robert Sarvis.

6th House of Delegates District (Wythe, Carroll, Smyth Counties): Warner's 34% of the vote is behind Democrat McGrady's 37% from his 2013 delegates race, which somehow House Democrats convinced themselves was in the bag. About the same as Tim Kaine's 34% in 2012, but not an impressive showing based on prior Warner claims about Southwest popularity.

14th (Danville City; Pittsylvania and Henry Counties) & 16th (Pittsylvania and Henry Counties; Martinsville City) House of Delegates Districts: Warner received 48% of the vote in the Danville based 14th, marginally better than expected given his near defeat statewide. His 43% in the 16th was similar; better than normal Democrats, but only by a few points.  

It’s Never Over in Virginia

The dust has settled over the Commonwealth after election day 2014, and Mark Warner will survive to serve out another six years in the Senate ... assuming he stays that long. But there's no end to campaigns in Virginia, which because of our odd-year election cycle hosts heated elections every calendar year. For instance, with newly elected Congresswoman Barbara Comstock, there will soon be a special election for the 34th House of Delegates district. Other special elections will be held in the 4th district (Southwest Virginia, to replace newly elected State Senator Ben Chafin) and the 63rd district (Petersburg, to replace newly elected State Senator Rosalyn Dance) -- but don't expect any surprises there. Here's a preview of what to look forward to in Virginia politics.

34th House of Delegates Special Election
Let's give a brief history of the 34th in the last few election cycles. In 2007, Republican incumbent Vince Callahan retired and the open seat was won in a good Democratic year by Margi Vanderhye. Margi had defeated Rip Sullivan in the Democratic primary (Rip is finally making his way to Richmond from the 48th District). I wonder if Rip's pleased that he didn't end up in the 34th, as in 2009 a Republican tsunami swept out Vanderhye by 422 votes.

Financing Responsive Government In Virginia

Dominion's Beneficence photo 140917VPAPDominion_zpsd270d10a.jpgCurious about who's benefited from Dominion's concern for Virginia's political process, I thought I'd survey the contributions to candidates reported on The Virginia Public Access Project. Intending to provide a roster of recipients, it became clear that it is easier to list General Assembly members who have missed the beneficence.

    Members of the Virginia Senate who are not beholden to Dominion:
  • None

    Members of the Virginia House of Delegates who are not beholden to Dominion:
  • Sullivan, Richard C. (Rip), Jr. (D-48th)
  • Rasoul, Sam (D-11th)
  • Lindsey, Joseph C. (D-90th)
  • Farrell, Peter F. (R-56th)
  • Bloxom, Robert S., Jr. (R-100th)
  • Berg, Mark J. (R-29th)
  • Adams, Leslie R. (R-16th)

The range of contribution amounts ranges wildly from a quarter thousand to a quarter million dollars and seems directly proportionate to some combination of seniority and influence. The fact that the highest percentage of contributions (but not by far: 54 to 43) goes to Republicans follows that logic but I have not looked at trends over time. The "honor rolls" for both chambers will be presented separately.  

For Del. Margaret Ransone, the World is Her Oyster?

Delegate Margaret B. Ransone (R) represents the 99th District in Virginia's House of Delegates.

Delegate Margaret B. Ransone is the daughter of Ronnie and Shirley Bevans, who own Bevans Oyster Company, Kinsale, VA.

Delegate Margaret B. Ransone is an employee of Bevans Oyster Company.

Delegate Margaret B. Ransone sponsored HB 648 that changes the dimension of the containers used by oyster harvesters, reducing the minimum size from 2,800 cubic inches to 2,500 cubic inches - a 10.7% reduction.  Because oysters are sold by the container, Bevans Oyster Company now sells 10.7% fewer oysters for the same price as before. Who benefits from this legislation?

Delegate Margaret B. Ransone sponsored HB 1092 , that prohibits localities from exercising eminent domain to condemn privately-leased riparian and general oyster planting grounds that are under lease from the Virginia Marine Resources Commission (VMRC). This means: If a locality wants to build a public pier or other public facility over an oyster lease held by Bevans Oyster Company, they are prohibited from doing so. Who benefits from this legislation?

Delegate Margaret B. Ransone had A. J. Erskine appointed to the VRMC. The VRMC regulates the taking and selling of oysters. Erskine is an employee of Bevans Oyster Company as well as a consultant to Cowart Seafood Company, Lottsburg, VA, a large oyster packer. Who benefits from this appointment? By the way -- a few months ago a driver for Cowart Seafood was arrested in Maryland for transporting under-sized oysters from Maryland to Virginia. Of the 188 bushels of oysters on Cowart Seafood truck, 187 contained undersized oysters.

Is this business as usual, or, is it conflict of interest??

Virginia Legislators Ignore Health Care Reality

We are no closer to expanding health care coverage in Virginia than we have ever been. Governor McAuliffe blames the tea party but that is too kind to the legislators who do not support expansion. They are either math challenged or corrupt, morally and/or ethically. The tea party provides obfuscation.

"There still is a House of Delegates which remains unmoved and unmoving on this issue." - Reverend John Peterson speaking at an Organizing Virginia vigil for Medicaid expansion just prior to the Senate joining the forces of obstruction

Hospitals and patients in Virginia have to live within the reality of the law whether or not one agrees or disagrees with the Affordable Care Act, explained John Peterson, Chairman of the Board of Augusta Health. So it is in all our best interests to find a solution that makes the law as workable as possible for as many patients and those who serve them as possible. $300 million in annual payments to Virginia hospitals were eliminated under the Affordable Care Act including disproportionate share hospital payments for treating the uninsured and cuts to Medicare reimbursement rates. Those Medicare reductions were to be offset by Medicaid expansion in the states.

Peterson outlined the effects of failing to expand Medicaid. Augusta Health provided some $25 million in uncompensated care last year and an additional $5 million in community benefits related to care.

Twelve Days of Christmas for Virginia Democrats: Day Five, Unchallenged Incumbents

This is the fifth part of a twelve part series looking at the challenges, obstacles, and future possibilities of Virginia Democrats. Here are the previous diaries: Day One, Competitive Districts. Day Two, Turnout Problems. Day Three, Past Mistakes. Day Four, Downstate Democrats. To show that you've read this diary and support the project, please vote in the poll at the end. Thank you!

On the fifth day of Christmas, the Commonwealth of Virginia gave to me ...

Incumbents who are so safe in their seats they don't remember the last time they had to actually campaign. Could they even fundraise if they tried? Do they know anything about targeting, polling, and tools like Votebuilder or Catalyst?

In 2013, 41 incumbent Delegates were not even challenged by another candidate, either by the other major party or by a minor party candidate. One more was able to win their first election without any challenge at all, walking right into office. That may seem sad, but it's an improvement over 2011, when 59 incumbents were unchallenged in their newly drawn districts. That's similar to elections in 2003, 2005, and 2007, where over 60 delegates on average, almost two-thirds of the chamber, were unchallenged. In the ten years from 2003 to 2013, well over half of all delegate races were unchallenged.