Tuesday, October 27, 2020
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The Republican Culture of Death

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When is it okay to start talking about the fact that Republican policies actually kill people?

Crossposted from Loudoun Progress.

The most obvious example is Republican support for our government killing people, explicitly and in cold blood. That's what the death penalty is. State sanctioned killing of a citizen in cold blood. Regardless of your position on the morality or constitutionality of the death penalty, it is, quite simply, support for state-sanctioned death. And as an example of the bedrock principle for Republicans that the state should be allowed to kill its citizens, there is no better example.

How about Republican's opposition to reasonable gun safety legislation? To the point of actively repealing gun safety legislation already in place when they take control of a state? Did you know that Missouri repealed background checks for gun purchases recently? And when it did, gun murders went up 25%?

"Hey, this legislation will cause more people to be violently murdered!"

"Great, let's do it!"

Or the 17,000 women who will die because Republican-controlled states refuse to expand Medicaid?  

Bill Moyers: “Invisible Americans Get the Silent Treatment”

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It's just astonishing to us how long this campaign has gone on with no discussion of what's happening to poor people. Official Washington continues to see poverty with tunnel vision - "out of sight, out of mind."

So begins this post by Bill Moyers, whose title is included in the title of this post.

Too often poor people are forgotten in our politics.

It is appropriate to read the words of Moyers on this topic on this day, which would be the 104th birthday of his mentor, Prsident Lyndon Baines Johnson, vastly underrated as a President, whose Great Society programs did as much to alleviate poverty and discrimination in this country as did any other President, being matched only by the New Deal of FDR (which unfortunately did not address discrimination).

99.9 versus .1 – Krugman explains the top 1/1000th

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His column is titled We are the 99.9% and it is very much worth your time.  As he writes, according to a CBO report which only examines data up to 2005 (and it has gotten worse)
between 1979 and 2005 the inflation-adjusted, after-tax income of Americans in the middle of the income distribution rose 21 percent. The equivalent number for the richest 0.1 percent rose 400 percent.

And if we look at Capital Gains taxes, currently at only 15%,

taxes on capital gains are much lower than they were in 1979 - and the richest one-thousandth of Americans account for half of all income from capital gains.

Given this history, Krugman asks a very basic question, why do Republicans advocate further tax cuts for the very rich even as they warn about deficits and demand drastic cuts in social insurance programs?

Please keep reading.

Democrats should hold their ground

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cross-posted from Daily Kos

Give Republicans credit for this: They don't chase the center, they try to move it. Democrats can play a loser's game of scrambling after a center being pushed ever rightward. Or they can stand their ground and show how far their opponents are from moderate, problem-solving governance. Why should Democrats take Republican advice that Republicans themselves would never be foolish enough to follow?

That is the final paragraph of E. J. Dionne's column in today's Washington Post, titled as is this diary, Democrats should hold their ground.

Of course, apparently some, including David Axelrod, are already prepared to cave on things like extending Bush tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.  That - Axelrod's position - is not only economically stupid, it is a political stupid and weak move.

I think Dionne is largely on topic in his column, which I will explore a bit more as well as offer some additional words of my own.