Home Budget, Economy Stanford Hooverite Bashes Old People, Lies for WSJ

Stanford Hooverite Bashes Old People, Lies for WSJ

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This diagram is all you need to know to understand why we have deficits, that along with the planned and calculated malfeasance of Wall St and the idoligcally-tainted deregulation which imperiled us all. And yet, despite their blame (and being at the helm when the economy went south), the same freepers and Randians try to get you to imagine that something else, or rather everyone else, is responsible. Alternet’s Joshua Holland has an excellent response to the WSJ’s profligate and ongoing effort to deceive the American public and bash nearly every sector of the 99%.  

This deception they and the corporatists who read them hope will cause Americans to turn on one another, resenting the perceived and fictional accounts of others having it better and/or easier than they.  They turn students and their families against teachers, patients against nurses, private sector workers against public sector workers. Union workers against private sector, blue collar against white, rich against poor, “whites” against people of color, young versus old and on and on.  You get the idea.  It is all by design.

They want Americans not to care about each other, but rather to act as the corporatist do, in a zero sum game.  But John Cogan’s WSJ article reaches new lows.

Please read Holland’s response to see just how John Cogan lies with statistics. He pulls a supposed and fabricated disparity between what people put into Social Security and Medicare v. what they take out over their years in the two programs out of a rabbit’s hat. I love (snark) how he calls seniors making a pittance each year “millionaires.” The average is just about $12,000 a year.  Some  millionaire status!  He conflates Medicare with Social Security, though, because Social Security has contributed nothing to the deficit and never will, Social Security should not even be part of this discussion.  Why are we even having this conversation when growing jobs would resolve most of the budgetary shortfalls?  Not only does Cogan mix apples and oranges, as Holland shows, but also he manipulates readers in a faux case worthy of FAUX “News.”  

  • commentator1

    More and more I am seeing evidence that many economists both inside and outside of educational institutions are bought and paid for by big corporations. Maybe this is where the AG is going: “Tow the corporate line or forget your teaching career.”