Home Virginia Politics Virginia News Headlines: Friday Morning

Virginia News Headlines: Friday Morning

172
13
SHARE

Here are a few national and Virginia news headlines, political and otherwise, for Friday, March 27. Also, check out comedian Aasif Mandvi at the 2015 RTCA Dinner ripping the corporate media’s incompetence and idiocy.

*Plane crash called deliberate act (“French prosecutor blames co-pilot in chilling scenario”)

*How can airlines prevent crashes like this in future?

*Egypt warships steam toward Yemen coast (“Saudi Arabia continued its bombardment as Egypt prepared to join the Arab-led offensive against Shiite rebels in Yemen.”)

*Pat Robertson: ‘Was the co-pilot a Muslim? Why did he want to kill all those people?’ (More right-wing bigotry and lunacy.)

*GOP’s “religious freedom” riot: How a bigoted Indiana law could roil GOP primary (Did I just say “more right-wing bigotry and lunacy?” Yes, yes I did!)

*Senate Approves Budget of G.O.P. Wishes in All-Night Session (This budget would be ruinous for America.)

*Scott Walker Adjusts Stance on Immigration at Private Dinner

*Krugman: Mornings in Blue America (“So, as I said at the beginning, the fact that we’re now seeing mornings in blue America – solid job growth both at the national level and in states that have defied the right’s tax-cutting, deregulatory orthodoxy – is a big problem for conservatives. Although they would never admit it, events have proved their most cherished beliefs wrong.”)

*Derik Jones enters Senate race for Dance’s seat

*McAuliffe says he will amend ethics bill before signing (“The bill would cap gifts from lobbyists to lawmakers at $100. But it has come under fire for a variety of perceived loopholes, including elimination of an aggregate cap on gifts.” This thing needs a TON of help!)

*McAuliffe vetoes redistricting bills, defends Atlantic Coast Pipeline project (The Atlantic Coast Pipeline is not particularly defensible, and it certainly shouldn’t be defended by a Democratic governor.)

*Press Pass: McAuliffe stands by Atlantic Coast Pipeline (Utter bull****.)

*Va. Attorney General Herring to focus on predatory lending (We badly need alternatives to these predators.)

*McAuliffe signs clean budget, bill vetoes coming

*U-Va. student involved in violent arrest makes brief court appearance

*Virginia lawmakers break from party on budget

*Prosecutors urge appeals court to uphold McDonnell conviction

*Fairfax County supervisor race heats up over ‘troll’ remark on Twitter

*Big Problems for Republicans in Fairfax County

*Firehouse primary will now include all Prince William GOP candidates (And big problems for Republicans in Prince William County too!)

*How U-Va. engineered a tuition cut for some with a price hike for others

*At U-Va., a price hike for some will fund a price cut for others (As always, David Ramadan is wrong.)

*Local lawmakers concerned with federal spending plans

*Ideas for boosting affordable housing in Arlington to be aired on Saturday

*Arlington, Alexandria Democrats line up for local, state races this spring

*A damp Friday as winter returns (“It’s almost April, but we’re still talking about wind chills and snow flakes.” Blech.)

  • Quizzical

    A good article on the effort to save Sweet Briar.

    http://www.c-ville.com/saving-

    Includes a discussion of the impact on Amherst.

  • Today, the White House released a comprehensive plan that identifies critical actions to be taken by key Federal departments and agencies to combat the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.  The National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, which was developed by the interagency Task Force for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in response to Executive Order 13676: Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, outlines steps for implementing the National Strategy on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and addressing the policy recommendations of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) report on Combating Antibiotic Resistance.

    Antibiotics have been a critical public health tool since the discovery of penicillin in 1928, saving the lives of millions of people around the world.  The emergence of drug resistance in bacteria is undermining our ability to treat bacterial infections and perform a range of modern medical procedures, including chemotherapy, surgery, dialysis, and organ transplantation.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that drug-resistant bacteria cause 23,000 deaths and 2 million illnesses each year in the United States. Antibiotic resistance also threatens animal health, agriculture, and the economy.

    The National Action Plan provides a roadmap to guide the Nation in rising to the challenge of antibiotic resistance and potentially saving thousands of lives.  The Action Plan outlines Federal activities over the next five years to enhance domestic and international capacity to prevent and contain outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant infections; maintain the efficacy of current and new antibiotics; and develop and deploy next-generation diagnostics, antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutics.  These activities are consistent with investments in the President’s FY 2016 Budget, which nearly doubles the amount of Federal funding for combating and preventing antibiotic resistance to more than $1.2 billion.

    Implementation of the Action Plan will require the sustained, coordinated, and complementary efforts of individuals and groups around the world, including public and private sector partners, healthcare providers, healthcare leaders, veterinarians, agriculture industry leaders, manufacturers, policymakers, and patients.  Efforts carried out as part of the Action Plan will help the Federal government curb the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria with the goal of saving lives.

    To provide advice, information, and recommendations regarding programs and policies intended to support and evaluate the implementation of Executive Order 13676, including the National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, the Secretary of Health and Human Services established the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (Advisory Council). HHS is currently seeking nominations of individuals who are interested in being considered for appointment to the Advisory Council.

    National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    The Action Plan is organized around five goals for collaborative action by the U.S. Government, in partnership with foreign governments, individuals, and organizations aiming to strengthen healthcare, public health, veterinary medicine, agriculture, food safety, and research and manufacturing.  Aggressive action will move the nation towards major reductions in the incidence of urgent and serious drug-resistant threats.

    These goals are:

    ·         Slow the Emergence of Resistant Bacteria and Prevent the Spread of Resistant Infections.

    ·         Strengthen National One-Health Surveillance Efforts to Combat Resistance,

    ·         Advance Development and Use of Rapid and Innovative Diagnostic Tests for Identification and Characterization of Resistant Bacteria.

    ·         Accelerate Basic and Applied Research and Development for New Antibiotics, Other Therapeutics, and Vaccines.

    ·         Improve International Collaboration and Capacities for Antibiotic Resistance Prevention, Surveillance, Control, and Antibiotic Research and Development.

    Slow the Emergence of Resistant Bacteria and

    Prevent the Spread of Resistant Infections

    Judicious use of antibiotics in healthcare and agricultural settings is essential to slow the emergence of resistance and extend the useful lifetime of effective antibiotics.  The CDC estimates that up to half of all human antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate. The Action Plan includes activities to foster improvements in the appropriate use of antibiotics (i.e., antibiotic stewardship) by improving prescribing practices across all healthcare settings. , preventing the spread of drug-resistant threats in healthcare facilities and communities, and continuing to eliminate the use of medically-important antibiotics for growth promotion in animals.

    By 2020, significant outcomes in this area will include:

    ·         Establishment of antimicrobial stewardship programs in all acute care hospitals and improved antimicrobial stewardship across all healthcare settings.

    ·         Reduction of inappropriate antibiotic use by 50% in outpatient settings and by 20% in inpatient settings.

    ·         Establishment of State Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Prevention (Protect) Programs in all 50 states to monitor regionally important multi-drug resistant organisms and provide feedback and technical assistance to health care facilities.

    ·         Elimination of the use of medically-important antibiotics for growth promotion in food-producing animals.

    Strengthen National-Surveillance Efforts for Resistant Bacteria

    The “One-Health” approach to disease surveillance for human and animal pathogens is critical to combat antibiotic resistance.  Improved detection and control of antibiotic resistance in human and animal pathogens will be achieved through a “One-Health” approach to disease surveillance that integrates data from multiple monitoring networks.  This approach will significantly increase the currently very limited data and provide high-quality information, including detailed genomic data, necessary to track resistant bacteria in diverse settings in a timely fashion.

    By 2020, significant outcomes in this area will include:

    ·         Creation of a regional public health network-the Detect Network of AR Regional Laboratories-for resistance testing, a specimen repository for resistant bacterial strains, and a National Sequence Database of Resistant Pathogens.

    ·         Routine reporting of antibiotic use and resistance data to National Health Safety Network (NHSN) by 95% of Medicare-eligible hospitals, as well as by Department of Defense  and Veterans Affairs healthcare facilities.

    ·         Routine testing of zoonotic and animal pathogens for antibiotic susceptibility at ten to twenty National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN) and Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN) member laboratories, using standardized testing methods and data sharing practices.

    Advance Development and Use of Rapid and Innovative Diagnostic Tests for Identification and Characterization of Resistant Bacteria

    With the support of funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, today’s researchers are taking advantage of new technologies to develop rapid “point-of-need” diagnostic tests that can be used during a healthcare visit to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections and identify bacterial drug susceptibilities – an innovation that could significantly reduce unnecessary antibiotic use.  The availability of new rapid diagnostic tests, combined with ongoing use of culture-based assays to identify new resistance mechanisms, will advance the detection and control of resistant bacteria.

    By 2020, significant outcomes in this area will include:

    ·         Development and dissemination of authorized point-of-need diagnostic tests that rapidly distinguish between bacterial and viral infections.

    ·         Validation of diagnostic tests that rapidly determine the antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria of public health concern.

    Accelerate Basic and Applied Research and Development for

    New Antibiotics, Other Therapeutics, and Vaccines

    Antibiotics that lose their effectiveness for treating human disease through antibiotic resistance must be replaced with new drugs; alternatives to antibiotics are also needed in veterinary medicine.  The Action Plan will boost basic scientific research, attract greater private investment, and facilitate clinical trials in order to advance the discovery and development of new antibiotics and alternative therapies to combat resistance.

    By 2020, significant outcomes in this area will include:

    ·         Characterization of the gut microbiome-the communities of microorganisms that live within the gastrointestinal tract-of at least one animal species raised for food.  This outcome will help us understand how antibiotic treatments disrupt normal gut bacteria and how animal growth might be promoted-and bacterial diseases might be treated-without using antibiotics.

    ·         Advancement of at least two new antibiotic drug candidates, non-traditional therapeutics, and/or vaccines from pre-clinical testing to clinical trials for treatment or prevention of human disease.

    ·         Development of at least three new drug candidates or probiotic treatments as alternatives to antibiotics for promoting growth or preventing disease in animals.

    ·         Creation of a biopharmaceutical incubator-a consortium of academic, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry partners-to promote innovation and increase the number of antibiotics and antibodies in the drug-development pipeline.

    Improve International Collaboration and Capacities for

    Antibiotic Resistance Prevention, Surveillance, Control, and

    Antibiotic Research and Development

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that requires global solutions.  The United States will engage with international ministries and institutions to strengthen national and international capacities to detect, monitor, analyze, and report antibiotic resistance; provide resources and incentives to spur the development of therapeutics and diagnostics for use in humans and animals; and strengthen regional networks and global partnerships that help prevent and control the emergence and spread of resistance.

    By 2020, significant outcomes in this area will include:

    ·         Elevation of antibiotic resistance as an international priority for global health and security.

    ·         Enhanced capacity to identify antimicrobial resistant pathogens in more than 15 partner countries.

    ·         Establishment of a common U.S.-European Union (EU) system for sharing and analyzing bacterial resistance patterns for priority pathogens.

    ·         Development of a global database to collect harmonized quantitative data on the use of antibacterial agents in animals.

    ·         Development of national plans to combat antibiotic resistance and improve antibiotic stewardship in low- and middle-income countries.

    ·         Strengthened regulatory and supply chain systems that assure the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibiotics used in low- and middle-income countries.

    ###

  • Courtesy of the Virginia State Board of Elections

    Senate – Member

    March 26, 2015, 5:00pm

    Candidate’s Name Party District Date of Filing

    As of the above mentioned date and time, the following individuals have filed form SBE-501 (Certificate of

    Candidate Qualification) with the Virginia Department of Elections.

    John C. Miller Democrat Senate -1 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    Mark R. Matney Republican Senate -1 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Mamie E. Locke Democrat Senate -2 Friday, March 13, 2015

    Thomas K. Norment, Jr. Republican Senate -3 Tuesday, March 17, 2015

    Ryan T. McDougle Republican Senate -4 Thursday, March 12, 2015

    Kenneth Cooper Alexander Democrat Senate -5 Monday, March 09, 2015

    Lynwood W. Lewis, Jr. Democrat Senate -6 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Richard H. Ottinger Republican Senate -6 Tuesday, March 10, 2015

    Gary T. McCollum Democrat Senate -7 Tuesday, January 13, 2015

    Frank W. Wagner Republican Senate -7 Friday, March 20, 2015

    H. D. “Dave” Belote Democrat Senate -8 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Bill DeSteph Republican Senate -8 Sunday, March 01, 2015

    Craig M. Hudgins Republican Senate -8 Thursday, March 05, 2015

    A. Donald McEachin Democrat Senate -9 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    Alex McMurtrie, Jr. Democrat Senate -10 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    Emily C. Francis Democrat Senate -10 Thursday, January 22, 2015

    Daniel A. Gecker Democrat Senate -10 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Bruce W. Tyler Republican Senate -10 Wednesday, March 04, 2015

    Glen H. Sturtevant, Jr. Republican Senate -10 Sunday, March 08, 2015

    Amanda Freeman Chase Republican Senate -11 Wednesday, March 04, 2015

    Barry F. Moore Republican Senate -11 Tuesday, March 03, 2015

    Steve Martin Republican Senate -11 Tuesday, March 03, 2015

    Edward S. Whitlock, III Republican Senate -12 Thursday, February 12, 2015

    Siobhan S. Dunnavant Republican Senate -12 Wednesday, March 04, 2015

    Vince M. Haley Republican Senate -12 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    W.R. “Bill” Janis Republican Senate -12 Friday, March 06, 2015

    B. Jill McCabe Democrat Senate -13 Tuesday, March 24, 2015

    Richard H. Dick Black Republican Senate -13 Friday, March 20, 2015

    John A. Cosgrove Republican Senate -14 Monday, March 16, 2015

    William “Bill” Haley Republican Senate -14 Monday, March 23, 2015

    Frank M. Ruff Republican Senate -15 Wednesday, March 11, 2015

    Joseph D. Morrissey Democrat Senate -16 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    Joseph E. Preston Democrat Senate -16 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    Rosalyn R. Dance Democrat Senate -16 Monday, March 23, 2015

    Traci L. Dippert Democrat Senate -17 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Bryce E. Reeves Republican Senate -17 Tuesday, March 10, 2015

    L. Louise Lucas Democrat Senate -18 Friday, March 13, 2015

    David R. Suetterlein Republican Senate -19 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Kim E. Adkins Democrat Senate -20 Tuesday, March 03, 2015

    William M. Stanely, Jr. Republican Senate -20 Friday, March 20, 2015

    John S. Edwards Democrat Senate -21 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    Nancy V. Dye Republican Senate -21 Saturday, March 07, 2015

    Thomas A. Garrett, Jr. Republican Senate -22 Tuesday, March 24, 2015

    Stephen D. “Steve” Newman Republican Senate -23 Monday, March 23, 2015

    Emmett W. Hanger, Jr. Republican Senate -24 Wednesday, March 11, 2015

    Marshall W. Pattie Republican Senate -24 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    R. Creigh Deeds Democrat Senate -25 Friday, March 20, 2015

    April D. Moore Democrat Senate -26 Friday, March 06, 2015

    Mark D. Obenshain Republican Senate -26 Wednesday, March 04, 2015

    Jill Holtzman Vogel Republican Senate -27 Monday, March 23, 2015

    Richard H. Stuart Republican Senate -28 Monday, March 23, 2015

    Jeremy S. McPike Democrat Senate -29 Thursday, March 12, 2015

    Michael T. Futrell Democrat Senate -29 Wednesday, January 14, 2015

    Atif M. Qarni Democrat Senate -29 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Hal Parrish Republican Senate -29 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Barbara A. Favola Democrat Senate -31 Thursday, March 12, 2015

    Janet D. Howell Democrat Senate -32 Monday, February 09, 2015

    Jennifer T. Wexton Democrat Senate -33 Tuesday, March 24, 2015

    J. C. “Chap” Peterson Democrat Senate -34 Tuesday, March 24, 2015

    Richard L. “Dick” Saslaw Democrat Senate -35 Saturday, February 14, 2015

    Scott A. Surovell Democrat Senate -36 Wednesday, February 11, 2015

    Mark Allen Cannady Democrat Senate -36 Thursday, March 26, 2015

    Gerald “Jerry” Foreman Republican Senate -36 Tuesday, March 17, 2015

    Dave Marsden Democrat Senate -37 Thursday, March 19, 2015

    A. Benton Chafin, Jr. Republican Senate -38 Wednesday, March 04, 2015

    Joe R. Murray Republican Senate -39 Wednesday, March 25, 2015

    C.W. “Bill” Carrico Republican Senate -40 Wednesday, March 04, 2015

  • truthteller
  • So much for Rand Paul being a social “libertarian.”

  • “Senator Reid has been a champion for progressive values for decades and a model elected official for generations of leaders to come. His role securing affordable quality healthcare for all Americans will be remembered by history as one of the greatest moral achievements of the early 21st century.  I congratulate him on his years of service to the people of Nevada and our country and wish him the best of luck in retirement.”

  • GOVERNOR GUTS PETERSEN BILL TO PROTECT VIRGINIANS FROM GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE

    FAIRFAX, Va. – Senator Chap Petersen (D-Fairfax City) has received notice from Virginia Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian Moran that the Governor of Virginia, Terence R. McAuliffe, will amend his bill to protect citizens from government surveillance.

    The Governor will make two significant amendments to the bill: (SB 965)

    The first amendment will eliminate the seven (7) day limit for government retention of personally identifying data, replacing the time with a 60 day limit.

    The second amendment will eliminate the inclusion of all surveillance technologies, and make the bill only applicable for license plate readers (LPRs).

    Statement of Senator Petersen upon receiving notice that his bill will be dramatically amended:

    These surveillance technologies are Big Government infringing on the rights of Virginians to live their lives in peace without government scrutiny. Given the nature of these amendments, which defeat that right, I would have rather had the Governor veto the bill.

    Senator Petersen previously founded the “Ben Franklin Liberty Caucus” along with Delegate Rich Anderson (R-Prince William), a bipartisan group of legislators committed to protecting personal privacy in the Commonwealth.

    The ACLU of Virginia supported Senator Petersen’s bill, and will issue a statement opposing the Governor’s amendments shortly.

  • The Democratic Party of Virginia elected today a new Chair, Susan Swecker of Richmond and Monterey. Swecker was confirmed on Friday evening and will immediately assume all duties of the position. She will be formally sworn in at the party’s next Central Committee meeting in June.

    “From creating jobs to protecting the rights of all Virginians, Democrats have made incredible progress for the Commonwealth,” said Chairwoman Swecker. “Virginia will be in the spotlight nationally this year as we work to grow our numbers in the House of Delegates and take back the majority in the State Senate. And, of course, in 2016 we will campaign tirelessly to ensure that a Democrat continues to hold the Presidency. We have incredible opportunities ahead of us and I’m eager to continue moving Virginia forward.”

    Swecker has a long history with the party, starting out as the 22-year-old Chair of Highland County and rising through the ranks to Executive Director. She currently serves as a Democratic National Committeewoman, serving on the Rules and Bylaws and Executive Committees. Her term as chair follows a successful year for the organization under the leadership of Mayor Dwight Jones, who oversaw the re-election of Senator Mark Warner — and the rest of the party’s Congressional delegation — despite a tough national climate for Democrats.

    “I’ve known Susan for years and I am so pleased to pass the torch to such a wonderful Democrat,” said outgoing chair Mayor Dwight Jones. “I am extremely confident that she will use her decades of experience to build upon the progress made by our party. I have no doubt she will take it to new and exciting heights.”

    “I’m thrilled to have Susan at the helm of the Democratic Party,” said Governor Terry McAuliffe. “She’s been a consistent and effective leader for many years; she knows our values and mission better than anyone. We have the opportunity to win key elections this fall to advance progressive policies to strengthen the middle class. Susan will be invaluable in harnessing the power of our grassroots to achieve common-sense solutions for Virginia.”