Home 2017 Races And Now for Some COMPLETELY Different Virginia Poll Results: Northam 53%-Gillespie 39%

And Now for Some COMPLETELY Different Virginia Poll Results: Northam 53%-Gillespie 39%

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To put it mildly, this new poll from Quinnipiac University differs greatly (and is much, much better from a Democratic perspective) from the three polls – Roanoke College, which had Northam up 6 points;  Monmouth, which actually had Gillespie up 1 point; and CNU, which had Northam up 5 points –  that came out yesterday. So which poll to believe? As usual, I’d suggest averaging the polls, which would mean that the last four polls (-1, +4, +6, +14) give us a Northam lead of about 6 points. With that, here are the Q-Poll results…enjoy! 🙂

With strong support from women and non-white voters and a double-digit lead among independent voters, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam holds a 53 – 39 percent likely voter lead over Republican Ed Gillespie in the Virginia governor’s race, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released today. Libertarian Party candidate Cliff Hyra has 2 percent.

Today’s result compares to a 51 – 41 percent likely voter lead for Northam in a September 19 survey by the independent Quinnipiac (KWIN-uh-pe-ack) University.

From October 12 – 17, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,088 Virginia likely voters with a margin of error of +/- 3.7 percentage points, including the design effect. Live interviewers call landlines and cell phones.

Women likely voters back Northam 61 – 31 percent, with 2 percent for Hyra. Men are divided as 47 percent back Gillespie and 44 percent back Northam, with 2 percent for Hyra.

Independent voters back the Democrat 53 – 39 percent, with 3 percent for Hyra. Democrats back Northam 93 – 2 percent, with 2 percent for Hyra. Republicans back Gillespie 92 – 5 percent, with 1 percent for Hyra.

White likely voters are divided with 48 percent for Gillespie, 47 percent for Northam and 2 percent for Hyra. Non-white voters go to Northam 71 – 15 percent, with 3 percent for Hyra.

The economy is the most important issue in deciding how they will vote for governor, 25 percent of Virginia voters say, while 23 percent say health care and 11 percent cite education.

“One number says it all. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam’s 14-point lead among independent voters is all you need to know about the race to be Virginia’s next governor,” said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll.

“The two major-party candidates do about the same among their respective party bases, but a candidate who carries independent voters by double-digits is almost always a winner.

Virginia likely voters give Northam a 51 – 30 percent favorability rating.

Gillespie gets a negative 39 – 45 percent favorability rating.

For Hyra, 85 percent haven’t heard enough to form an opinion. President Trump’s Approval

Virginia likely voters disapprove 62 – 35 percent of the job President Donald Trump is doing. Republicans approve 81 – 15 percent and white voters with no college degree approve 55 – 41 percent. White men are divided 49 – 49 percent. Every other party, gender, education and racial group disapproves.

If a candidate for governor supports President Trump, 51 percent of Virginia likely voters say they are less likely to vote for that candidate, as 18 percent say more likely and 30 percent say Trump support makes no difference in their vote.

Virginia likely voters disagree 61 – 23 percent with Trump’s tweet that Northam is fighting for MS-13 gangs and for sanctuary cities.

“The drag from President Donald Trump’s unpopularity on Republican Gillespie is gigantic. President Trump has a 35 percent approval rating in the Old Dominion – a very low number by historical standards,” Brown added.

Likely voters approve 56 – 36 percent of the job Gov. Terry McAuliffe is doing.

The Quinnipiac University Poll, directed by Douglas Schwartz, Ph.D., conducts public opinion surveys nationwide, and statewide polls in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Florida, Ohio, Virginia, Iowa and Colorado as a public service and for research.

Visit poll.qu.edu or www.facebook.com/quinnipiacpoll