Wednesday, July 15, 2020
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Arlington Creates Legal Authority for Solar-on-Schools Power Purchase Agreements; Plans October...

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Good stuff; cross posted from Power for the People VA By Will Driscoll Clearing a legal hurdle that may affect other Virginia school systems, Arlington Public Schools...

With Rooftop Solar Prices So Low, Virginia Schools Can’t Pass Up...

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By Will Driscoll, cross posted from Power for the People VA With today’s low solar prices, schools can save money by installing rooftop solar, and...

The Accord Is Struck: Prince William County School Board, Board of...

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by Ken Boddye, Democratic Candidate for Delegate in the Virginia House of Delegates 51st District (Eastern Prince William County) After months of debate, open and closed...

Audio: Tom Davis, Supposedly “Moderate” Republican, Panders to Hard Right as...

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Check out the following audio of former Rep. Tom Davis, who the Washington Post always liked to tell us was (supposedly) a "moderate" Republican,...

Video: Debate Over LGBT Protections in Fairfax Public Schools Gets Weird...

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Yesterday evening, the Fairfax County Public School Board held a meeting, at which several Fairfax County residents expressed their views on LGBT protections and...

Video: Arlington County School Board Debate

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Just posting the video for now from last night's Arlington County Democratic Committee (ACDC) School Board debate. Candidates are current School Board member Nancy...

Exclusive Blue Virginia Interview: Arlington County School Board Candidate Michael Shea

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I recently posted my interview with Arlington County School Board candidate Tannia Talento. Yesterday, I had a chance to sit down with another Democratic...

State Sen. Scott Surovell Urges Fairfax to #advertiseadime; Fairfax Supervisor Jeff...

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There's a fascinating - and important - fight going on right now in Fairfax County over how much taxes need to go up in...

McDonnell’s Pontius Pilate Pits State Against Localities

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The Virginia budget shell game is creating tensions in localities revealing the no tax pledge's fallacy of composition. In the black and white pledger world, there are no consequences to cutting budgets. But stark reality is inspiring grassroots action demanding remedies to the McDonnell budget: LOCAL TAXES.

"I have softened the blow on local governments to allow them to phase in a small differential in tax revenues that need to be paid by local employers. I've allowed them five years to phase that in. I've tried to accommodate them, but these are local employees. They pay for teachers; they're local employees. They have the obligation...We pay a third of all the retirement for teachers even though they're one hundred percent local employees. This differential that everybody's talking about is a very small slice of the whole retirement pie" - Governor McDonnell to WHSV, Staunton, VA. (use Search: McDonnell, then select "1 on 1: Va. Gov. Bob McDonnell)

In Augusta County, an informal citizens group (Support Our Schools) has overwhelmingly demonstrated displeasure, coming out in force to show that grassroots support for funding and necessary tax revenues far outweighs the astroturf pronouncements of the Tea Party. However, popular, oversimplified mantras continue to inform the debate.

Record-Breaking Numbers of Public School Students Losing Their Homes

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We live in a car. Don't just look away.Sorry, homeless children. If you're not rich people begging for tax cuts or wildly profitable oil corporations trying to keep multi-billion-dollar subsidies, good luck getting Congress to pay any attention to you.

With the GOP-controlled House continuing to ignore the ongoing unemployment crisis, more families are becoming homeless. The New York Times reports that's leading to a record-breaking number of public school students becoming homeless:

Nationally, the number of homeless students at public schools reached an all-time high after the recession hit. In the 2008-9 school year, there were 954,914 homeless students, compared with 679,724 in 2006-7, according to the latest data from the United States Department of Education.

Homeless children fare significantly worse in school than other poor children. In Virginia, 21.2 percent of students who are homeless at some point during their high school years drop out, compared with 14.8 percent of all poor children, the state's Department of Education says. In Colorado, the high school graduation rate is 72 percent for all students, 59 percent for poor students and 48 percent for homeless students, according to data from the state's education Web site.

A friend who works in child & family services says becoming homeless can destroy the support systems most parents take for granted. "I have had several clients that have had to move overnight to other parts of the state to a different homeless shelter. It's terrible," she says. "I try to form relationships with these young girls, but before they know it their entire life changes and they lose important constant relationships like their teacher or counselor."

For more, check out this 60 Minutes story from March. To find volunteer opportunities to help students in your community, visit UnitedWay.org.