Home Sponsored Content Michigan State University Exonerated by NCAA in Nassar Scandal

Michigan State University Exonerated by NCAA in Nassar Scandal

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The entire country watched Larry Nassar’s trial when he was accused of assaulting girls and women when he worked as a campus sports doctor for Michigan State athletes and helped train gymnasts in the area. They continued to watch when he was sentenced to decades in prison for child pornography and assault in three different cases.

However, what many did not know was the fact that Michigan State University was also being investigated by the NCAA for their involvement in the offenses. Now that the school has been cleared, it is making the news.

The NCAA was largely investigating claims that Michigan State had attempted to cover up the crimes Nassar committed while working there. At the end of August, the NCAA exonerated the school and stated that there would be no reason for further inquiry. To enforce that the school had been cleared of any rules violations, the NCAA sent a letter confirming it to Michigan State.

Prior to the final ruling from the NCAA, Michigan State had already reached a $500 million settlement with the women and girls that were assaulted by Nassar. After the NCAA made their decision, the school also released a statement agreeing with the decision, and stating that they would continue to stay committed to the health and safety of their students.

“It was quite clear that Michigan State was fully cooperative during the entire investigation,” said Patrick Barone of the Barone Defense Firm. “It is a relief that they were exonerated by the NCAA for the crime Larry Nassar committed. Hopefully now that Nassar is serving time, those young women can finally start to heal.”

Unfortunately, the case is not entirely over just yet. Kathie Klages, a former gymnastics coach at Michigan State, also appeared in court at the end of August. She has been charged with lying to investigators after she denied that any gymnast had ever complained to her about Nassar. Her trial began at the end of September and if found guilty, she could face up to four years in prison on a felony charge.