Home Virginia Politics Virginia GOP Delegate Makes National Fool Of Himself

Virginia GOP Delegate Makes National Fool Of Himself

257
42
SHARE

Virginia Del. Jim Lemunyon (R-67) (pictured here with his right wingnut pal, Frank Wolf), the genius who brought us open enrollment for Fairfax schools, now makes a fool of himself for a national audience.

The U.S. Congress is in a state of serious disrepair and cannot fix itself. It has reached this point over the course of many years-in fact over many decades. Regardless of the party in power, Congress has demonstrated a growing inability to effectively address the major issues of our time, including soaring federal debt and the extension of federal authority to states and localities.

[…]

The remedy is in Article V of the Constitution, which permits a convention to be called for the purpose of proposing constitutional amendments

In the Virginia House of Delegates, I introduced a resolution (H.J. 183) calling for a constitutional convention to restrain the national government as well. Requests by two-thirds or 34 states are required for a convention to be called

My god, THIS nutjob is the individual who defeated the superb Chuck Caputo?  What on earth were voters thinking in November 2009?  I mean, seriously, did Virginia go through a period of temporary insanity last November or what to elect people like Jim Lemunyon?  How embarrassing.

  • Not only was Chuck Caputo defeated, but a common-sense delegate like David Poisson was defeated as well, by a guy who couldn’t even win a school board seat 2 years earlier.

    And this is what we get. maybe it was apathy, maybe it was coat-tails; probably a combination of both, but thanks to Kookinelli, we’ve got a lot of political ammo for 2011.

  • chance that this does pass and everything happens like he wants it to, that the next Republican administration can’t pass 99% of what it did during the Bush reign…right? They’ll essentially have to sit there, twiddle their thumbs and go “Yep, we won” and nothing else.

  • …you could explain what exactly you think is bad about having a Constitutional Convention to propose amendments?  

    • VA Blogger

      But had you bothered to even read LeMunyon’s column, you’ll find that most of your fears are simply irrational.

      First, you state that this puts “even more” power to the states. Color me a skeptic, but haven’t the last 220 years drained power from the states? I have a hard time seeing either a) how one can say it puts “even more” power, as if states have a lot of power vis-a-vis the federal government currently, or b) why this is in anyway a bad thing.

      Second, it would absolutely take a big government, tax-and-spend liberal to say not only that a balanced budget would be a “terrible idea”, but that the reason for it is obvious. I’m very curious to hear why a balanced budget, or a ban on unfunded mandates stretching already-thin state budgets, would be “terrible”.

      Third, as LeMunyon gratuitously pointed out, there’s little chance of anything “sneaking” out of a Convention, since 3/4ths of the state have to ratify it. As LeMunyon points out, there are many more than 12 “blue” states that would have to sign onto this, thus preventing any cultural fears you have.

      Fourth, bringing together people in a peaceful manner to rationally discuss how best our government should govern is never “troubling”. If you truly believe the Constitution is in need of serious reform, then there’s no reason to issue a knee-jerk rejection of LeMunyon’s idea, based on nothing more than misguided fears and partisan hackery.

      Finally, other than you and the people paying you, no one believes Frank Wolf is a “nutjob” right-winger, and given both LeMunyon and Wolf’s moderate records in their respective legislatures, I think both gentlemen and their constituents would smile favorably upon the comparison.

      I now await your response that will be snotty and snide and not address a single point I raised.

      • …how the President of the United States enacted multiple years of budgets without going through the Congress? The REPUBLICAN Congress? I agree that a balanced budget amendment is a bad idea. But a line item veto is a good idea. And allowing the states to have some push back against the federal government is also a good idea, Ezra Klein’s ramblings notwithstanding.  

        • I have read his stuff for a while, and I don’t find him any more knowledgeable or informed than any other twenty something bloggers out there. And as far as I can tell, he’s never had a real job.  

          • Even if we were in control, I would still argue that a Convention is a good idea. Congress itself is part of the problem – not the Democrats or the Republicans. We don’t have to “change the rules” in order to rein in an out of control federal government. The best way to do that is to circumvent the biggest obstacle. We have a method in the Constitution to do that. I don’t think it’s beyond the realm of debate to argue we should use it.  

  • Glen Tomkins

    Our AG is a Tenther, now we have a delegate signing on the Fifther movement.  The common tendency here seems to be disunion.

    Well, I certainly don’t think that the Commonwealth would be better off as its own sovereign state, but if it does come to that, we simply must do something about that flag of ours.  No way do we want that ungodly mess hanging up at the UN representing us to the world.  

    Oh, wait!  If this crowd is in charge, we won’t be joining the UN.  We’ll be some pariah state, like Somalia or something, only with worse weather.  Maybe at that point we could turn to outright piracy to balance the budget.

    But I better stop talking now, as these people might take my suggestions seriously.  A little piracy in our waters certainly stands a better chance of balancing the budget than drilling in those waters, so my suggestions probably are less fantastical than what they espouse.

  • double-helical

    Wow!  I just joined this site and I am appalled at the posts on this issue.  Insider jokes that are incomprehensible, and a passion for ad hominem attacks.  Please, people, try to discuss the issues cogently, and resist logical fallacies.  It sounds like a right-wing rant page!

    thanks,