What You Expect From the DPVA

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    In the lead-up to the selection of a new Party Chair, the new Executive Director of the DPVA rolled out an initiative to provide a weekly update. A new chair was selected who emphasized “communications” to the Central Committee. Brian Moran said “We must communicate with our grassroots activists…”

    That was three weeks ago. That first update was featured on the grassroots blogs. It garnered 623 views as of today. Two weeks ago we got our second weekly update. Actually, we didn’t get it, we had to look for it. Message to DPVA, your site is not compelling enough (actually not compelling at all) to get traffic and to use as a primary communications tool. As of this morning it had 140 views. After this, a few more will have been added; maybe. Want a reason to watch? How about this highlight:

    “As a former member…well actually I still am a current member…I hope soon…of the Alexandria Democratic Committee…” – Brian Moran, DPVA Chair

    There’s some communicating. Oh, and the third installment is overdue. But from the beginning, the concept was awkward. What does the DPVA think the audience for these “updates” is? If it is the Central Committee, fine. If it is Democrats, not so fine. If it is the grassroots, fail. Mr. Mills as a narrator, fine. Mr. Mills on the front line going after the other guys, not fine at all. Where are the members of the legislature going after all this budget craziness from Bob McDonnell? On the blogs, like this one. Where are the grassroots staying informed? Not here.

    Communications. Blah. Grassroots. Blah, blah.

    • communicator. I mean, hell, he couldn’t even articulate, at a blogger dinner in the spring of 2008, why he wanted to be governor, except to ramble on about “redistricting reform.” And then, he couldn’t even decide if that was “nonpartisan redistricting” or “bipartisan redistricting.”  WTF?  Anyway, that was the beginning of the end of my support – certainly my enthusiastic support – for Brian Moran.

      Then, we have Brian Moran’s version of emotion in a speech – yell!!! really!!!!! loud!!!!!  Then we have Brian Moran’s version of serious, heavyweight policy ideas…oh forget that, the guy’s a complete lightweight/empty suit. Then, we have Brian Moran’s moral credibility to speak on education issues, or really any issue given his heinous “day job”…oh forget that.  Then, we have Brian Moran’s deep understanding of grassroots politics…hahahahahahahaha, sorry. 🙂

      Given all that, what else would anyone expect anything different from what you’ve described above with Brian Moran as chair of DPVA?

    • Elaine in Roanoke

      1. Redesign that logo that looks like a crazed blue beast on meth.

      2. Redesign the recently “redesigned” website to be both informative and interesting.

      3. Find someone who can articulate what the DPVA stands for in 300 words or less.

      4. Have someone at HQ who can take the time to communicate to bloggers and new media people. Get the website linked to other sites…after you give people a reason to want to check out the website.

      5. Learn the power of You Tube as a vehicle for more effective communication.

      I could go on and on, but what the H***. It’s always a waste of time. I’m a member of my congressional district committee and I never bother to check that website. There’s no reason to.

    • VADEM

      The DPVA has a website????

      who knew?? snark

    • Tom

      Since I became an official party member, meaning magisterial district and county committee member, in Jan. 2006 I have repeatedly pleaded with the DPVA, first working through my committee chairs and via direct e-mail, tel. and face-to-face contacts with senior DPVA elected and paid (staff)officials to update the events section of the wen site so we know when and where events such as the quarterly DPVA meetings occur. But event as recently as the Central Committee meeting in Newport News where Brian was elected chair, I left tel. messages and sent e-mail messages to four senior staffers, including David Mills who has never once replied to any message I’ve sent to him. Those several messages were sent less than 3 weeks before the Dec. meeting and I only asked them to tell me the location (i.e., which hotel) in Newport News where the meeting would be held so I could book a room. I finally got one tel. message from a young lady whose name I don’t recall telling me the hotel, but a week after I had read the name/location of the hotel in a WaPo article and by then all the rooms were booked. I am glad I didn’t waste my time and money anyway, given the chair election results combined with the unresponsive attitude of most of the DPVA elected and the most senior paid staffer (David Mills).

      The real reason these people are not good communicators is very basic – they don’t want to “communicate”, they just want us to work hard, contribute money and then go away until they decide they need us again. Well, they need us all the time and because they choose not to communicate in either direction (send or receive) they never learn that they do need us and then can’t figure out why they keep losing elections.

      I’ll work my ass off for Jim Webb if we can get him to accept the draft for the 2012 election because he does care and does communicate well after he’s done his homework on each issue, and I might even contribute a little money to

      his campaign. But the DPVA will never get a penny of my money nor a minute of my time – they do nothing for the candidates I support, and do nothing to recruit and groom/train/nurture candidates we could support. And that will not change until we have completely new leadership at the state party level. We now have three years to come up with a better chair, who should be able to do some real house-cleaning in terms of what’s been so wrong with the DPVA for so long.

      Let’s get rolling on that Draft Jim Webb initiative.  

    • Mike1987

      Color sucks, logo sucks, no information and it seems to be one way. No two way dialog so I assume they just want to yak without knowing if anyone is there.